A few days ago three Phoenix residents were sent to the hospital after being stung by bees. According to Captain Overton, the patients are a man and woman, both 35, and a 13-year-old boy. It’s not clear how many times they were stung.

Austina Mendoza, aunt to the teenager that was stung, reported that the boy is allergic to bees and tried to run away from the bees and call 911. It is also noted that the boy who was attacked was doing yard work when he was attacked suddenly.

The boy is now recovering at home but the condition of the other two victims are still unknown. Overton also reported that is uncertain what sparked the attack but rest assured the public that the bees have been contained.

Why Bees Attack

Attacks depend on the the type of bee.

HONEY BEES
These pollinators are very social and are the most common type of bee in Arizona. They normally only sting in order to protect their colonies or babies. Honey bees only sting when stepped on, roughly handled, or alerted by the release of attack pheromones by another bee.

AFRICANIZED HONEY BEES (AHB)
Also known as “killer bees,” AHBs sense threats at greater distances than other bees and become more agitated with less provocation. Vibrations and sounds from power equipment, tractors, lawnmowers, ect. are often big aggravating factors for these kinds of bees. AHBs are extremely defensive of their hives, but away from their home, they are no more aggressive than other bees or wasps. AHBs can sting multiple times when provoked, but one sting from a AHB is not more powerful or painful than the sting of other bees.

EUROPEAN HONEY BEES
Like most other bees that pollinate, European Honey Bees do not attack unless provoked. These kind of bees are one of Arizona’s best pollinators and typically leave animals and humans alone unless they believe their hive is being attacked in some way. European Honey bees are also very social and will sacrifice their lives with a single sting when defending their home.

CARPENTER BEES
Carpenter bees are very effective pollinators in Arizona but are unlike any other bees in that carpenter bees tunnel into wood to lay their eggs. Male carpenter bees do not have stingers, but the females do and will typically only sting in self-defense or in defense of their burrows.

Early Relocation of Bees Helps Prevent Bee Attacks in Arizona

Bee attacks are typically more common in springtime when bees are most active and can be quite tragic should they occur.

Beeman-Bee Removal is passionate about keeping Phoenix residents and its bees safe. Our mission is to remove bees before attacks happen. Like humans, bees need their space to. Chemicals used by pesticide companies cause more harm than good. When you have a bee problem call the BeeMan 602-748-9378. Do your part in keeping our community safe.

Saving the bees is one of the most important things we can do as a society. These beautiful creatures are responsible for pollinating approximately 80% of our crops. If the bees die, we die.